Double-vision: shooting 3D with 2 cameras

Double-vision: shooting 3D with 2 cameras

Judging by the presence of 3D camera technology at Photokina this year, 3D is gaining some serious momentum with manufacturers. For professional photographers though, the last year has been a time of experimentation with a brand new "old" technique. Especially if you don’t have a 3D camera, how do you get the 3D effect?

Markus Berger at Red Bull Photofiles gave this video tutorial on how to perfect the photoshop method. Pro photographer Ian Coble used the other logical approach – he used two cameras. Read on to find out about his shoot with pro kayaker Tao Berman.

What brief did you get for the shoot?
What made this shoot so incredible wasn't just the sheer athleticism of Tao in front of the camera, but the amount of creativity I was afforded. When organizing the shoot, Red Bull essentially gave me free reign to shoot it however I wanted.

When did you start getting interested in 3D?
For the last few months I've been dying to try shooting something in 3D. Since I saw the James Cameron movie Avatar, I wanted to test 3D technology and see how it translated from video to still images. When this shoot with Tao came about, I knew this was the shoot to make it happen.

3D photography is still pretty new. What research did you do for the shoot?
I'd come across plenty of other 3D photos, but none of them were action or motion based. Everything I was coming across was static – whether it was a landscape, portrait or still life. Not finding any 3D (also called anaglyph) photos of sports got me really excited. This was going to be something relatively new. Also, it's always fun to be the guinea pig on new things as you never know what you're going to encounter or how it's going to turn out.

What shooting method did you use?
With new versions of Photoshop, it's now easier to create 3D images in post-production with a single camera and manipulate the single resulting image. But that's not what I wanted to do here.

With this shoot, I wanted to achieve a true 3D image, by shooting two cameras offset from one another. The advantage in using two cameras is that the resulting 3D image has more detailed depth and texture as it does not require Photoshop to extrapolate and create new information. Even with two camera method though, you still have to do some post-production editing.

When you have your two images, what post-production work is required?
The basics behind creating a 3D image in Photoshop are to stack images in layers. Once there, you have to determine the focal point of your image and align the two frames. From there, you have to remove the red channel from the right eye‘s image and remove the green and blue channels from the left eye’s image.

You can do this for example in the levels window by selecting the appropriate channel and changing the output level from 255 to 0. Once you have a right eye image (which will look green) and a left eye image (which should appear red) you need to adjust your blending mode from normal to screen. This will leave you with a 3D image that you can make any final density or color corrections to.

What camera settings did you use?
I shot these images with 2 Nikon D3’s. Both cameras were set to manual exposure mode with a shutter speed of 1/500th and an aperture of f/ 5.6. Given the dark nature of the canyon we were shooting in, I had to bump the ISO up to 1600 in order to be able to shoot at a fast enough shutter speed to freeze the action.

I set the focus of both cameras by pre-focusing on a rock near the lip of the drop. Once set, I locked the focus off so that it wouldn’t slip during the sequence.

How did you mount the camera?
I mounted one of the cameras on a Manfrotto tripod with a Manfrotto 3265 joystick head. The second camera was mounted on a Manfrotto 244 Magic Arm, which was clamped to one leg of the tripod. This positioned both cameras on a relatively even plane, which would not have been achievable with two tripods, given the rocky terrain of the river bank.

Did you have to experiment to get the right distance between the camera bodies?
Determining the distance between the camera bodies was quite tough to figure out. I had to do a lot of research online, and eventually discovered that the ideal distance apart between the cameras is determined by how far away your subject is.

An easy way to determine the distance between cameras – this isn’t 100% accurate, but it’s pretty close – is to separate the cameras by a factor of 1/30th of the distance to the focal point of your frame. The further away the subject is, the further apart the cameras must be in order to achieve a 3D affect. For this location, I worked out that a distance of about 12 inches (30 centimeters) would provide enough separation to give the resulting image enough depth.

When shooting 3D, the cameras have to be perfectly level – or at least on the same angle “off” of level – or the resulting image will cause the viewer to get a headache as their eyes try to focus on two non-corresponding horizons. To achieve a level frame on each camera, I secured my iPhone to each camera and used the iHandy Level App to zero in on the horizons.

Did the cameras have the same lenses?
Yes, both cameras had the same lenses on them (a Nikon 28-70mm f/2.8 AFS lens). Both cameras have to have an identical field of vision for 3D to work, so both lenses need to be the same.

How did you trigger the cameras at the same time?
I triggered my cameras with two Nikon MC-30 remote trigger releases. I sandwiched the two releases together and pressed down on the triggers at the same time. I practiced this at home prior to the shoot in order to make sure that both cameras would fire at exactly the same time.

I experimented with a few other methods, including remote triggering with pocket wizards, but the MC-30 route gave me the most reliable results. Right now, I’m in the process of re-wiring the MC-30’s for future shoots so that one trigger will fork off to each camera and eliminate the need to press two triggers simultaneously.


What challenges did you have on the day?
Given the inherent danger in running waterfalls, and not wanting to subject Tao to any more danger than necessary, we only had a few attempts to make the shoot work. Just to make sure, we used 3 cameras at all times. I had two cameras shooting 3D and one camera shooting an alternative angle to ensure we had maximum coverage and guarantee differing angles and vantage points.

The other challenge was the inability to check our results in the field. Given the remote location, the limited amount of daylight we had to work with and the amount of time it takes to process a 3D image, we weren’t able to review the 3D image on location. All our research had to be done in advance and we had to trust that what we were doing was accurate. In this age of digital, it’s tough to go back to the times when you can’t check your work in the field and make adjustments.

Were you happy with the final results? What could be enhanced or experimented with?
In the end, the shoot turned out great. The 3D image turned out better than I could have hoped.

For future shoots, in addition to re-wiring my MC-30 remote triggers, I’m also trying to fabricate a sliding mounting bracket that allows two cameras to be mounted on the same tripod.  This will allow me to make quick adjustments to the separation distance between the cameras. The method I employed on this shoot worked, but it wasn’t really efficient for making quick changes.

Additionally, I’d love to shoot at a location that has more depth to it. The location of this waterfall didn’t have a lot of separation between the foreground and background. I’d love to experiment more with a location that provided more depth to it, as I think the resulting 3D image would turn out even better.

I'm excited to put this technology to use again on some more shoots in the near future, stay tuned!

www.iancoble.com

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Six Skate Photographers You Need To Know

Time to show some love to the photographers out there who pound the pavement day after day, hoping to capture that outstanding skate shot. Here are six skate photographers you need to know...

© Jonathan Mehring / Red Bull Illume

Davy van Laere

@philzwijsen #ElementWaterproof @elementeurope #Bilbao @soloskatemag @aproposskatemag

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"French" Fred Mortagne

I am re-discovering this picture of @charlescollet that I didn’t originally pick, from what was an epic shooting day. I had so much great material that this one got abandoned. Maybe it didn’t attract my attention because we don’t fully see the skateboard, but I now like this picture very much. What about you? // Full immersive video of that shooting day on my Youtube channel (LINK IN BIO) // As not seen in #AttraperAuVol // #frenchfredfoto #skateboarding #fullpipes #LeicaMMonochrom

A post shared by Fred Mortagne (@frenchfred) on Jul 12, 2017 at 2:03pm PDT


Roberto Alegria

Jonathan Mehring

Roberto Bragotto

Jeroen Nieuwhuis

2/3 Red Bull Illume | CLOSE-UP FINAL IMAGE Early in 2016 I sat down with art director @ElroyKlee & cinematographer @ErikJournee from @NEWDAY.studio to come up with a concept for this year’s @redbullillume After pitching different ideas at each other we quickly agreed to try shooting something with mirrors. Instead of a street spot we decided to go indoors, but not to a typical skatepark. We contacted the guys at skatepark Pier 15 in Breda (The Netherlands). This skatepark is more like an indoor ‘street spot’, with concrete ramps, curbs and stairs. We knew this would fit the image we had in mind. We started cutting mirrors in our studio into different (small and large) shapes and tested them to see how big they needed to be to see the trick and different parts of the obstacle. We opted for triangle shaped mirrors to complement the obstacles in the background, to create a clean, even balanced look. Almost 12 mirrors later we finally had the pieces that would fit the picture. We headed out to Pier 15 together with Dutch skateboarder @RobMaatman. A couple of c-stands were used to angle the mirrors in a way that they almost looked like a puzzle; connect all the pieces and you see the entire obstacle. The outcome is a balanced action picture combined with graphic pieces and skatepark objects. #Photography #behindthescenes #RedBull #RedBullillume #mamiya #mediumformat #broncolor #skateboarding #skateboard #flash #robmaatman #newdaystudio #emerica #iso1200magazine #famousbtsmag

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Did we miss a skate photographer you follow and we should check out? Let us know on Facebook or Instagram!

All Out with Ale di Lullo

We caught up with crazy Italian MTB photographer Ale di Lullo to talk about what's been going on with him since that fateful evening in Chicago, when he took home a Category Winner Award for his shot of Aaron Chase rolling over a New York taxi cab.

© Ale di Lullo

What’s been going on with you since the Winner Award Ceremony?

It's been a very busy off-season and my Air Miles Award program is just on fire. I've been shooting catalogs and some adventure stuff all over the world, from New Zealand to the Dolomites, passing through British Columbia, Oregon, California and most of Europe.

Has anything changed for you since making it to the Top 55 and in the Top 275?

It didn't change anything with clients and the kind of shooting I do, but it gave me more tranquility and confidence in trying to experiment a bit more, or at least as far as a mostly commercial bike photographer can go.

And you know what?

I think that the Red Bull Illume categories really make sense and summarize the shots in them really well. When I'm on assignment I often find myself thinking "Oh this could be a good shot for Spirit category...or for Wings or for Playground!"

So maybe it slightly changed the way I think when I'm shooting...at least it helped me to categorize things.

Actually, there is something that changed in me after the Red bull Illume finals...it was already an ongoing process, but now it's annoying...I became my own worst critic! I struggle to be happy with any of my shots!! (Fortunately, my clients still are...ahahah)

Any cool projects you’re working on?

I'm trying to bring a new way into what I do for my clients and bringing them more exclusive shoots and less contest/event stuff. More planning, more research, more exploration and bringing back the essence of mountain biking, which is just out there in nature.

Can we expect a new project with Aaron Chase? Involving other forms of transport?

I have some ideas following the transportation wave...but the shot was more on the point of view, the new angle. The car was just a medium, so my mind is roaming more for new angles or new things to ride.
But I cannot exclude that I won't be back with some new vehicles!

I also found a mountain location where I want to try a Masterpiece shot...I'm studying angles and light right now. Hopefully it will happen before the end of the year...but there is a lot of building involved.

Aaron is probably gonna be part of a couple of adventures during the summer, but nothing for a specific Red Bull Illume project...but you never know when the next Illume shot could happen, right?

I try to keep myself active and exposed to cool situations when the magic could happen and if Aaron is around, chances are just higher!

What do you think the secret is to an image doing well in Red Bull Illume?

I think it's a very unpredictable balance between the classic photography rules (like composition and light) and the ability to tell a story...also for people who don't practice the sport or are passionate about a specific sport, which is hard to keep in mind sometimes for insiders.

You need to put yourself in the shoes of someone who has no knowledge of that sport and get the outside perspective. It's easy to forget that a Regular Joe won't have the same perception of the shot... so I believe that, in the end, it has to be an simple, essential, perfectly executed shot that tells a great story or the lifestyle around it. It's not easy.

Working together with any other Red Bull Illume finalists?

Well, I do some Downhill World Cup and Rampage shoots where a few finalists shoot as well, but we are just at the same event and not really working together. But it's always great to share ideas when you're there together with them.

And what’s your personal favorite from Red Bull Illume?

I clearly remember Dean Treml's shot which won the Enhance category...and Jody MacDonald Lifestyle winner shot. Lifestyle shots are the hardest to take...when you see the moment you want to capture, it's gone. Most of the time you're living it and it's hard to understand when the right moment is that will tell the whole story.

What's one crazy photo assignment you've been on?

That has to be shooting a bike catalog in British Columbia and California. 3 weeks, 15 bikes, 5 different riders, 10 different locations, 2 injuries, cold, hot, rain, snow, fog, high wind, customs delays with the bikes and the shortest daylight time of the year...and the specific request to shoot lifestyle in trashy and sketchy parts of different cities.

That was very hard, but really rewarding from a strictly professional point of view. There was a lot of variety and that specific type of lifestyle shot that only comes from a long road trip. Priceless. Unfortunately, logistically, it was a nightmare for the client, so next year we'll probably go back to a more traditional way of doing a catalog shoot.

Last question: will we see you again in 2019?

I'll be submitting a few shots for sure!! The fact of having 4 shots in the top 275 and a Category Winner set the bar pretty high for me. I don't have the 'illuminated idea' as it was for Chase cab driver shot just yet... but I already have a few nugs ready for the 2019 submission from a different shoot I did and maybe a new idea will pop into my mind while I'm on the road, just as it was for the cab shot.

Make sure to follow Ale di Lullo on Facebook and Instagram!

How It's Made: Bike on Bike Action

Falling into photography through writing and after a crash course shooting BMX with some of the world's biggest photographers, Ryan Fudger's passion for still images was triggered.

© Ryan Fudger / Red Bull Illume

"I really don’t know anything about motorcycles. I’ve actually spent most of my life with an unnatural fear of them. There’s just something about BMXers and motorcycles that don’t go well together. Putting my personal fear aside I spent ten or so days on the road chasing Corey Martinez, Garrett Reynolds, and Tony Neyer through the South, as they mobbed through small towns on motorcycles with their bikes strapped to the backs.

This particular photo was shot on a stretch of road known as Tail Of The Dragon in Deals Gap, North Carolina – 318 curves in 11 miles, all of which I spent hanging out the back of a minivan maxing out the memory buffer on my Canon 6D to the point I actually got motion sickness.

This particular photo was shot with a Canon 20-200 F2.8L at a motion-blur inducing 1/50th of a second shutter speed at f4.5 and ISO 400.

In all seriousness, I had the easy part hanging out of that minivan, as it was only a few miles after this photo was shot that one of the crew ended up over-cooking a turn and crashing. Fortunately, no one was seriously hurt, and although the bike did need some repairs, we eventually continued south to Florida until we hit the Keys."

For more epic photos, head over to our Instagram and follow us on Facebook.

Behind the Shot: Neon Wakeskate

Daniel Vojtech is known for pushing his photography to the limit, and he's come up with some mindbending imagery. For this shot, he combined 3D printing with wakeskating. Not only that, he also used a contraption made up of over 130 DSLR's. Check the story behind the shot below!

© Daniel Vojtech / Red Bull Illume

"3D printing is new and a very popular industry so I wanted to see if it was possible to combine it with sports photography. My concept was to scan an athlete with a 3D scanner, print it and then reshoot this final 3D print in a real environment Wakeskating was a real challenge and also interesting to me so for this project I invited the best wakeskate female athlete Zuzana Vrablova.

For the final image Zuzana and I decided together to shoot a slide on the rail. The first part of the photoshoot was in the 3D scanner which was in a room with more than 130 DSLRs photographing Zuzana from all different angles. Because I wanted a more interesting and complex project I decided to shoot nine different positions instead of one, to show the entire sequence.

So we simulated the same positions as during the trick in the real environment. Rendering 3D models and creating final 3D prints took more than one month. When I had all the figures I started to think about an environment for them. Wakeskate is a water sport so water is must. After some time I created a night skyline with more than 300 liters of water in my studio. This took more than the next month.

The final photoshoot wasn’t so complicated because everything was built and ready. The only problem were the splashes. For this I had two assistants with small water pumps to create splashes from the board."

To see more epic shots, head over to our Instagram and make sure to give us a follow!

Climb through the Red Bull Illume years

Ever since Red Bull Illume started in 2007, it has been witness to some spectacular climbing imagery. Not only that, climbing photos have also consistently impressed the judges every single edition.

Red Bull Illume 2010: Adam Kokot, Spirit category winner

© Adam Kokot / Red Bull Illume

So let's take a look at some of the coolest climbing photos that have made it into the final rounds throughout Red Bull Illume history!

Make sure to follow Red Bull Illume on Facebook and Instagram for more amazing adventure and action shots!

Own a piece of Red Bull Illume history!

Can't get enough of the amazing imagery of the world's best adventure and action sports photos? We've got you covered with our Limited Edition Coffee Table Book. Want to own one? Read on below!

Showcasing the finalists of the 2016 Red Bull Illume competition, there are only 5,000 copies of this limited edition collectable book, each individually numbered. It displays all 275 semi-finalist images, highlighting the top 55 images by including photographer biographies, their stories about their shot and the technical details.

And this time around, we're sweetening the deal - each book comes with a Fine Art Print of the Overall Winner, a photo shot by Lorenz Holder.

The Red Bull Illume Coffee Table Book is a true collector's item and can be purchased here.

A part of the profit resulting from the sale of this book will be donated to Wings for Life and used solely for the purpose of spinal cord research.

 

 

InstaBangers: Red Bull Illume

We're kicking off a new series in which we'll be taking a look at the Instagram accounts of the Red Bull Illume photographers. Let's start by showing you some of the biggest InstaBangers from Red Bull Illume history...

We hope you're sitting down for these...

Dave Lehl

David Carlier

Garth Milan

@robbiemaddison keeps it cool for this #RedBullIllume #SneakPeek shot by @garthmilan

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Jens Staudt

Flip into the weekend! #SneakPeek © Jens Staudt #redbullillume #bike

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Nate Hughes

Jeremiah Watt

A climbers' hands tell a story. Photo: @miahwatt #SneakPeek #redbullillume #climbing

A post shared by Red Bull Illume (@redbullillume) on

Check out the Red Bull Illume Instagram for some more gems and make sure to give the guys listed above a follow: Dave Lehl, David Carlier, Garth Milan, Jens Staudt, Nate Hughes and Jeremiah Watt.

From the Windy City to the Aurora Borealis: Catching up with Emil Sollie

Emil Sollie shot into the Top 55 of Red Bull Illume Image Quest 2016 with his amazing nighttime shot of Mons Røisland in Folgefonna, Norway! Following his week in the Windy City, he flew straight to Norway's Lofoten for an epic photo mission with Mick Fanning, and we caught up with him to see what he's been up to.

© Emil Sollie

What’s been going on with you since the Winner Award Ceremony?

There's been a lot going on! I went straight from the Winner Award Ceremony in Chicago to Lofoten, up north in Norway with surfer Mick Fanning and a full-on Red Bull crew. The mission was to shoot Mick surfing under the Aurora Borealis. That turned out pretty well! (Check out the shots below). Otherwise I've been shooting a lot of snowboarding, been exploring Iceland for a week and just work a lot in general.

Has anything changed for you since making it to the Top 55? We saw you were in a few TV shows…

A lot changed after making it to the Red Bull Illume Top 55. Been working with Red Bull on a lot of bigger projects, as they put budgets to missions I pitch for them! The TV shows were actually because of the mission in Lofoten. That went 'hella' viral. Discovery came to my apartment to make a short documentary about the shoot and I happened to be live at the National Morning show. Pretty stoked about that!  

Any cool projects you’re working on?

There are. First up, there's a shoot with the national team of snowboarding at Folgefonna, one of the most epic locations for snowboarding on this planet! Folgefonna is the glacier where I happened to capture the picture that ended up in the Top 55 in 2016.

After that I'm going to follow a skydiving team for a couple of weeks.

What do you think the secret is to an image doing well in Red Bull Illume?

As I watched Lorenz win almost every category last year, I think it is the «perfect picture» photo contest.

Of course, there has to be some kind of action in the frame, but I think composition is the key to doing well. To be honest, I missed some proper action in the 2016 winner pics, but no hate, there were a lot of amazing pictures!

Working together with any other Red Bull Illume finalists?

Nope, not at the moment! But I am still in contact with a lot of them. I definitely met a lot of talented people over there!

And what’s your personal favorite from Red Bull Illume?

Overall it might be Burkard's photo from 2010. Really liked Lorenz`s from last year as well.

What's one crazy photo assignment you've been on?

The mission up north in Norway with Mick Fanning has to be the most crazy photo mission I've been a part of. We planned this photo for so long and there was a lot of elements to happen at the same time to get this photo. But I didn’t do it alone, the picture is both mine and Mats Grimseth's photo. Mats was the guy in the water with the flash!

Last question: will we see you again in 2019?

Yes, of course!

Looking to get inspired? Make sure to follow Red Bull Illume on Instagram!

Red Bull Illume teams up with Memento Smart Frame™

Since it began in 2007, Red Bull Illume has been widely recognized as the greatest action sports photography contest of its kind. For over 10 years, it has exhibited hundreds of pictures from the image quest, displaying them on unique lightboxes in stunning locations around the world. Such an innovative concept however requires a forward-thinking approach. It’s for this reason that Red Bull Illume is proud to announce their recent partnership with Memento Electronics.

The Canadian company specializes in the design and manufacturing of intelligent and highly innovative electronic devices for the rapidly growing home technology market. Its flagship product, the Memento Smart Frame, is the world´s most advanced 4K digital picture frame that allows to showcase photography with depth, sharpness and colours which was not possible until today.

Its Ultra High Definition technology and impressive display interface made them the perfect fit for Red Bull Illume. The Memento Smart Frames are set to enhance the Red Bull Illume Exhibit Tour by bringing the images to indoor locations as well. 

Ulrich Grill, founder of Red Bull Illume says; “Having Memento Smart Frame on board is an exciting development for the Exhibit Tour. True to our theme of illumination, the high definition displays will make it a unique experience for all who visit. We can’t wait to see the new technology in action and we are looking forward to a series of unforgettable exhibitions."

The outdoor exhibition is currently touring the globe and is soon to be followed by the indoor version; both of which may be visiting a city near you.

To learn more about Red Bull Illume and to keep up to date with the indoor and outdoor tour stops, head over to the Exhibit Tour page now. For more information about Memento Smart Frame click here

Nick Webster: What's in the Bag?

A master at combining natural and artificial lights, it's easy to spot a photo shot by Nick Webster. We caught up with him to talk about gear and take a look into his bag!

© Nick Webster

Talk us through your gear. What are your go-to items? 

I have swapped from the traditional DSLR to smaller mirrorless models now and my favourite camera to use is my Sony A7ii. It is a 24 Megapixel full frame camera which is fast enough to shoot sports. The handling is close to perfect and results are gorgeous. In terms of lenses, I shoot as much as possible with wide angles, as it gives so much more impact, so have zoom lenses in my bag covering everything from 16mm to 200mm. I also love Bowen’s new GenerationX studio lights. They are powered by in-built batteries so I can take them anywhere without the need for a plug socket. 

Is there anything special you carry with you on shoots? 

I always carry two-way radios when shooting. It makes a shoot so much easier. If working with an individual, such as a snowboarder, I can communicate with them without the need for mobile phones and the hassle of removing gloves or patchy reception. When shooting a sport like cycling, I can retune the radio to listen into the commissaire's car which broadcasts time gaps and incidents etc, so I can keep abreast of the action even when it is miles away.

When shooting in the snow, I now always carry a set of crampons with me. It gets very icy at the side of ski slopes and it’s never dignified to fall and end-up 100 metres down the mountain. I learnt this the hard way.

How do you choose gear for different projects? 

Size and weight is the main factor. I have to think how much I can carry with me. Cycling is a great example where my switch to mirrorless cameras has benefitted. I ride in the passenger seat of the team car and everything has to sit in the foot well, together with spare drinking bottles, energy bars and anything else the riders may need, like rain jackets and arm warmers. I also have to consider weight when shooting in the show, as I often have to snowboard to the park from the lift and the lighter my bag, the easier it is to ride.

Which piece of gear would you never leave at home? 

I never leave home without my Sony Cybershot RX100v. It may only be a compact, but it is packed with high-end features and the quality of photo is superb. I can shoot 4K video and super slow motion too. I never leave home without it.

Does your gear sometimes take a pounding to get the shots you’re known for? 

I have never been very precious with my gear. I put screen protector on the back, but apart from that it gets no special treatment. It’s never let me down. Half the time it is banging around as I run to get in position for a photo. In my career I have been run-over, had it hit by wayward footballs and been clamped to the roof of cars as it’s been driven through a storm. It all survived.

Any items you wish you could add to your bag?

I really wish Sony made a 300mm f/4 for it’s mirrorless range. I don’t need the big white f/2.8 lenses sports photographers traditionally use any longer. In the days when we all shot on film and the early days of shooting digital SLRs, you could only shoot up to ISO 400 before the quality was really compromised. As a result, I needed lenses which would suck in as much light as possible in order to allow me to shoot at lower sensitivities. The latest generations of sensors are so good it’s easy to shoot up to ISO6400 before seeing a significant drop-off, so swapping my big, cumbersome 300mm f/2.8 for a compact 300mm f/4 lens would be amazing.

Any tips for aspiring photographers? 

Don’t worry about your gear. You don’t need the fastest or best and latest model to take great shots. You just have to remember that before the late 1980s nobody had autofocus and it was that long ago that there were no motorwinds or in-built metering and the professionals were still producing outstanding results, because they were often anticipating the picture and with this skill and a little luck producing jaw-dropping pictures. Slow down and practice your technique. In my opinion, it’s a common mistake to hold your finger down on the shutter and hope you get one picture from the hundreds being captured. I often find it’s the shots I plan and know I want to take are the ones I like best.

Nick's Gear: 

  • Sony a7 Mark ii
  • Sony a6500
  • Sony 16-35mm f/4 Zeiss
  • Sony 24-70mm f/4 Zeiss
  • Sony 70-200mm f/4 G
  • Sony 55m f/1.8 Zeiss
  • Sony HVL-F60M Flash (x2)
  • Cactus V6iiS Remote triggers 
  • Memory Cards
  • Batteries
  • Business Cards
  • Sony Xperia XZ
  • Two Way Radio
  • Sensor Blower
  • Lens Cloth

See more of Nick's work on his website and by following him on Instagram. While you're there, make sure to give us a follow as well!