Surf girls on camera: shooting lifestyle & fashion with athletes

Surf girls on camera: shooting lifestyle & fashion with athletes

Although action sports photographers treat the great outdoors as their studio, don’t be surprised to hear that they’re not always on a glacier, beach or skatepark. To give their portfolios variety, they shoot commercial and fashion photography when the chance comes their way.

Well-respected surf photographer Agustin Munoz was given a brief by Somos Magazine in Peru to do a fashion shoot of some of the world’s best women surfers – including Sally Fitzgibbons, Sofia Mulanovich and Maya Gabeira – during their visit to a mid-season high performance camp in Peru.

The concept was both pretty obvious but also new for the sport: treat some down-to-earth surf girls as models for the day – in full make-up. Surprising to hear perhaps, but female surfers don’t get the opportunity to do fashion shoots that often.

“We tried to make the shoot different to a regular surfing shoot by mixing fashion with surfing action. Doing fashion shoots with athletes is usually pretty limited by what they can do but we always work something out. Obviously, if it’s an action sports shoot, it’s better to use athletes. If it’s a fashion shoot I prefer models."

“I was really happy with the shots I got though – the girls did a fantastic job.”

However Munoz wasn’t working with just any athletes. Sally Fitzgibbons (Australia) was the youngest and quickest, male or female, World Surfing Tour qualifier in ASP history. Sofia Mulanovich (Peru) was the first South American woman to win the ASP world title in 2004. Maya Gabeira (Brazil) surfed the biggest wave ever by a female when she successfully surfed a 45-foot wave at Dungeons Beach in South Africa. She also won the Billabong Girls Best Overall Performance Award for a record four years in a row.

After shooting the girls hitting the waves, Munoz gave each of them a theme to play for the interior shoot: soccer player (Fitzgibbons), film maker (Mulanovich), model (Gabeira) and artist (Nadja de Col). The day ended with the obligatory swim-suit shoot.

“The only problem was the weather and it’s pretty cloudy at that time of year in Peru so I concentrated on getting some interior shots from the house.”

As for equipment and post-production requirements for a fashion shoot, Munoz has his own preferences.

“Generally, I like to use pretty wide aperture lenses, like 85 – 1.8, 50 – 1.2, 24 – 1.4 and sometimes I use zoom lenses like a 200 – 2.8. As for flashes, I like to use Elinchrom. Normally I use soft boxes as they make the light softer and skin looks better. For this shoot, I also used a ring flash.”

“For post-production, most of the time I just have to fix the skin and colors, but it’s mostly just color corrections.”

For the girls, the shoot was a chance to be both feminine and show their credentials as top athletes. They were of course delighted with the final shots.

“What we normally do is so different,” said Maya Gabeira. “We’re always in the ocean and, you know, we can never wear make-up or really think about how we look out there. It was just fun to be a model for a day.”

Press play on the image to see the making of video and check out the gallery for a selection of surf and lifestyle photos of Sally Fitzgibbons, Sofia Mulanovich and Maya Gabeira as well as fashion shots from Agustin Munoz.

www.agustinmunoz.com, www.carlosserrao.com, www.redbullsurfing.com

 

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Living the nomadic life!

Red Bull Illume Image Quest 2013 and 2016 Finalist Dave Lehl recently made some pretty drastic changes in his life, so we figured we'd catch up with him to talk about life since Chicago.

© Dave Lehl / Red Bull Illume

It’s been a while since we last spoke. How have you been?

It's been a little bit of a wild ride lately, but things are going well!  

Has Red Bull Illume been an influence in the past year or so for you? Have you started thinking about photography differently, for example?

Oh, absolutely. The level of ingenuity, talent, and drive that went into all of the photos from last year's Red Bull Illume is hugely inspiring as well as crazy intimidating.

Every time I'm working on a photo I'm thinking in the back of my head, "Is this going to be enough to make it into the finals again?"  but I can never answer that question. The game has been upped so much that I'm always trying to think 3 or 4 steps ahead, but I never know if it's enough to compete with everyone else.

We understand you’ve moved into a van and are now living life on the road. How do you manage that as a photographer?

It's true. My girlfriend and I moved our lives and careers into a 38 foot (11,5 meters for all you metric users) travel trailer in June and have been living the nomadic life since then. We've got a toy hauler type trailer, which means that it's got a garage area in the back which we've turned into our studios. She's a jeweler and has her work area in one side of the garage area and I've got my desk and computer on the other.

As far as shooting, it's been awesome. I was in a bit of a creative rut back in Denver.  Once we hit the road, the new places we went and the people we met helped reignite my photographic passion.  I've shot more in the last 3 months than I did in the last year and a half in Denver.  Not only am I out shooting more but I'm meeting with brands and advertising agencies in all of the major cities that we're going to in order to get on their radar for future projects and campaigns.  There's no better marketing for yourself than face time.

What do you do if you need a studio for example?

That's one of the beautiful things about being an action photographer, I'm essentially a location shooter so luckily I don't need a studio too often. I have friends in or near most of the places we've posted  up, or at least a friend of a friend who can help with location help. If I do need a studio I just jump on Google and do a search and have a list of studios for rent nearby.

Has life on the road changed the gear you carry with you?

Coming from the snowboard industry, I could usually only shoot with what I could fit on the back of my snowmobile, so I learned a lot of tricks to make a little gear go a long way.  I've typically done my best to carry only what I absolutely need, so I've always run a fairly bare-bones setup.  

What’s your go-to setup right now?

I've shot Canon for the past 20 years but just recently Sony has been gracious enough to let me try out a couple different camera setups and I think I'm going to make the switch to Sony soon.  I've been trying out the Sony A9 for a few days now and it's pretty much the perfect camera! I'm hooked! 

For lighting I've been using Elinchrom for the last 12 years and couldn't be happier. I still use my 12 year old Ranger RX packs on every shoot and they've only ever been to the shop once. They've just released a new 1200 w/s flash system that I can't wait to get my hands on that will probably replace my Ranger packs.

Other than those, the only other piece of equipment that I use daily is my Mountainsmith Parralax pack, which I think is pretty much the perfect photo bag. They're a smaller company out of Colorado who make an amazing product and take photo bags very seriously.

Any cool projects you’re currently working on?

I keep a folder of photo ideas and concepts that I add to semi-regularly and dig into for inspiration.  It's on my list of things to do tomorrow to dig through the folder, find an idea to commit to, and contact an athlete here in Portland to make it happen with. Ben Raybourn lives here and is one of my favorite skateboarders, so I'm going to try to reach out to him in hopes of setting something up. Fingers crossed! 

Any advice for aspiring photographers?

In general my biggest advice to aspiring photographers is to assist! Although I studied photography in school, I learned everything I know about shooting from assisting other professionals! It's not always glamorous and you'll mop a lot of floors, but it pays off exponentially in the skills you learn. And also in this day and age it's insane not to take advantage of online tutorials. I'm not saying that it'll replace an actual photography degree from a reputable institution, but there are sooooo many amazing educational sites out there and up-and-comers should be taking advantage of them. I learned everything I know about photoshop from www.phlearn.com. Thanks, Aaron Nace!

Check out more of Dave's work by heading over to his website and giving him a follow on Instagram!

Time to Celebrate #WorldAnimalDay!

Adventure buddies come in all shapes and sizes, including animals. Whether they're dolphins, dogs, cats, birds, we love them all! So join us in celebrating #WorldAnimalDay!

© Jaanus Ree / Red Bull Illume

Behind the Shot: Second Story Drops

Brooklyn's very own Jonathan Mehring teamed up with legendary skater Aaron "Jaws" Homoki on this one while on the road in Boise, Idaho. And the story is a classic; skater and photographer team up, look for a spot, hit the spot, walk away with a banger. Read the story behind this steezy shot below!

© Jonathan Mehring / Red Bull Illume

"There is nothing like looking for spots with Aaron ‘Jaws’ Homoki. If skaters view the world differently than everyone else, then Jaws views it differently from nearly every skater as well."

"The whole crew was in the van looking out the windows for spots. Jaws was in there too, but instead of looking at street level, he was looking up! He’s always on the lookout for a second story drop spot – his specialty. This one, in Boise, Idaho while on tour with the Tumyeto crew, was no different."

"There was a shout from the back of the van: “Guys, guys! A second story drop!” We lurched to a halt and everyone looked around for the spot. After a few seconds we realized what he was talking about. He ran up to check it out and it was perfect. No cracks or rough ground impeding his runway."

"After making sure the filmer and I had our angles set and our cameras ready he went for it, not wanting to try anymore times than necessary. The impact could be felt with each attempt and I kept wondering how many tries he could take. Luckily after five or six attempts he rolled away clean and we were on our way."

To see more of Jonathan's work, make sure to check out his website and Instagram!

Seven Adventure Photographers You Need To Know

From hanging off of sheer cliff faces to catch the perfect shot, to braving the freezing cold because the light is spectacular, adventure photographers go through some serious challenges to bring you amazing imagery. So we decided to delve into the archives and bring you our take on the seven photographers you need to know!

© Kelvin Trautman / Red Bull Illume

John Dale

So excited to finally be able to share this image of my dad and his pup going for a good walk in the snow that made it to the Top 25 in the Spirit Category of the 2016 @redbullillume Image Quest. Honored and humbled to have my image make it through out of over 34k submissions from the top outdoor adventure photographers in the world. Photography has been a wild and stressful ride but I wouldn’t choose any other path. Thanks to everyone who’s encouraged me to keep at it the past few years, y’all have been instrumental. Psyched to keep shooting and good luck to the finalists! [Guadalupe Mountains National Park, NM - January 2015 - #getoutstayout #solarlife #explore #wanderlust #WeAreAllZeal #ExploreMore]

A post shared by John Dale | Photographer (@johndalephoto) on

Kelvin Trautman

Dave Lehl

Work. #santacruz #surf #california

A post shared by Dave Lehl (@davelehl) on

Tim Kemple

Krystle Wright

Highliner @carlmarrs takes a sunset walk high up in the North Cascades.

A post shared by Krystle Wright (@krystlejwright) on

Jakub Sedivy

Mike Leeds

For more spectacular photos, head over to our Instagram and make sure to hit that follow button!

Gearing Up for Shoots

Denis Klero, winner of the Red Bull Illume Image Quest 2016 Close-Up category, recently completed a gigantic photo-mission: three weeks on the road during the Red Bull Trans-Siberian Extreme, an ultra-stage bike race from Moscow to Vladivostok. Following that, there were no days off for him, as he headed out to the Red Bull Flugtag. Two completely different photo-missions, two different approaches and he talked us through them.

© Denis Klero

What's your go-to gear setup?

First of all, we need to divide shoots into two types; Active Reporting and Staged Photography.

During Active Reporting, what really matters is mobility, accessibility of gear and a quick response time. This is why I carry all my gear to the shoot in a backpack or rolling bag, and at the site I put it on a harness I attach to my belt (Photos of this are below).

To summarize the gear: I carry two cameras, two powerful flashes and some fast lenses - all of these are crucial to this kind of reporting.

Fast lenses, wide open, allow blurring the background when it's impossible to beautifully link foreground and background because of so-called "rubbish". 

Usually, I carry two Sony A99II, two flashes and four to five lenses; a 24mm 2.0, a 50mm 1.4, a 70-200mm 2.8 a 16-35mm 2.8 and (to be safe) a 15mm 2.8 fisheye.

Staged Photography is much simpler in terms of gear. I try to use one lens: 24–70 mm 2.8.First of all, in some cases it allows you not to distort space (70 mm), and in some cases it adds an effect of viewer's presence in the photo (35 mm). Availability of a large number of intermediate focal distances is an undeniable advantage.

Secondly, I work mostly with fixed aperture, and it is easier for me to zoom on a photo rather than to go forward and back. Contrary to reporting, staged photography makes it possible to work on the scene for a much longer time and to use and elaborate backgrounds for my own purposes. All the above mainly relates to wide-shot scenes. Of course, when I shoot portraits, still life, big details, I use different optics, including prime lenses.

In both cases, I use two cameras. During reporting, they are equipped with different lenses to have a possibility to quickly change the focal distance, simply by changing camera. This takes no more than a second while changing optics on one camera may take up to 15 seconds, which is inadmissible in some cases. The second camera is also a spare one for the case of possible malfunction. During staged photography, it is used as a reserve camera. It would be very hurtful if, due to a camera malfunction, the long hours spent on preparation on arranging the shooting goes down the drain.

What never leaves your bag/what goes with you to every shoot?

My brain! Everything depends on the type of shoot. I always have my Sony A99II in my bag, regardless of what I'm shooting on that given day or during that assignment.

How do you choose gear for different projects?

Surely, it depends on the specifics or, in case of staged photography, on the idea of the project. In case of events, the site size is of importance. It is necessary to understand whether a usual "report" set is sufficient for work, whether focal distances are sufficient. Then, if upper points are available, it is possible to use such lens as tilt-shift. Another important parameter for selection of additional gear is duration. The duration of the event determines availability of time to experiment with filters, lenses and any methods used in photography (long exposure, unusual shooting angles, etc.). Depending on the time of holding the event (day or night), a decision is made to use additional studio flashlights.

And it is possible to use any type of equipment at staged photography: from smartphone camera to a full-fledged analog camera. Everything depends on the creative task.

How different is packing for an event like the Trans-Siberian Extreme and for the Flugtag?

Red Bull Flugtag in comparison with Red Bull Trans-Siberian Extreme bicycle racing is a rather short, bright, and emotional event, just manage to shoot. Creativity involves usage of unusual points for shooting, that is why I try to get in such places where shooting is not obvious. All the rest is classical reporting: it is important to quickly see the moment and push the button. And the main thing here is that the gear does not fail. So, I rely on autofocus, especially when I shoot with open aperture.

It is simultaneously simpler and more complicated for Red Bull Trans-Siberian Extreme. The event is time-stretched, and action is the same day after day, so there is a chance to reshoot if something doesn't work. Lifestyle scenes are also quite long, you have time to take in the situation and compose the photo.

The tricky thing is that during 23 days a spectator watching the race is not bored when looking at your photos. You have to use all the potential of your brain and look for not only interesting creative solutions but use different technical means and special effects to create something new, non-standard, and unusual for such race. Here, your photographer's talent is not only fully manifested, but seriously improved due to the tasks solved.

Studio, artificial light, smoke cartridges, water sprays – all this gave the possibility to diversify photos. And at night I had to use additional flashlight.

In comparison with Flugtag kit, Trans-Siberian Extreme kit was upgraded with another camera — a mirrorless system Sony A9 and almost the same set of lenses (not available in the photo). This is the newest camera that came into the market this summer, and we decided to test it in the field. There are also two tripods in the kit, mainly to use at night or to install a remote camera with the possibility to run it at a distance.

Also, in the picture we can see a 220V car voltage converter for continuous charging of batteries of different devices. An Internet router is required to promptly send photos directly from car to web-site. Both kits have a laptop, which is necessary for quickly processing and transferring photographic materials for publications.

The used lighting gear is worth discussing separately.

 

In the picture, we can see impulse light with a possibility of high-speed synchronization, a LED lamp, smoke cartridges for generating fog and other effects, two types of light stands, light generating heads, etc.

LED lamp was used for night lifestyle shootings at stops during rest and for shooting cyclists from car while they are on road. Constant light is more convenient in such cases:

it enables the autofocus to work better, and the final picture does not feature "frozen" parts of moving parts of bicycle and driver, as with impulse light. And such light is just convenient to form a light-and shadow picture, so to speak, online.

At the top of Photo 4, there is overwrap: it was used to protect the lighting gear from rain.

During the race, I used two types of light stands because each one has its advantages: Black stands are light-weighted and compact, and chrome plated C-stands are convenient for use on uneven surfaces which are typical for races.

 

Smoke cartridges made it possible to diversify boring night photos. They added volume to the photo and made the light more visible and tangible.

Sometimes, in search of an unusual shooting angle I have to climb different piles and trees. To climb trees, I typically use usual climbing irons.

If there’s only one body + lens setup you could use for an assignment, what would you use?

Sony A99II + 24-70 2.8

Do you carry anything with you that no one else has?

I think I have nothing special in my bag.

Any items you would like to add to your gear bag?

It would be nice to have additional pockets and sections.

Any tips for starting photographers?

Start small and gradually complicate and increase the number of your gear. Do not think that if you buy all types of lenses and studio light you will get genius shots. You have to know how to use this equipment, I mean not only to study manuals but to understand experimentally how this gear affects the final result. Years may pass... Everything must be gradual. Good luck!

 

To see more of Denis' work, head over to his website and give him a follow on Instagram!

Red Bull Illume Visits Home!

Following stops in Chicago and Toronto, the Red Bull Illume Exhibit Tour is coming home for the month of September.

© Helge Kirchberger Photography / Red Bull Hangar-7

The official tour-stop home of Red Bull Illume has always been the impressive Hangar-7 in Salzburg, and this year is no different. This unique building, which houses a collection of historical aircraft and Formula 1 race cars is the perfect home for the Red Bull Illume Exhibit Tour.

The Exhibit Tour officially opens in the evening on 6 September, and can be visited by the public from 7 September onwards. The exhibit can be visited all day, Hangar-7 opening hours permitting, but we recommend going later in the day when it starts to get dark, as that is when the lightboxes really shine!

The last night of the Exhibit Tour will coincide with the Lange Nacht der Museen, which takes place on 7 October, 2017.

Jaakko Posti: What's in the Bag

Mixing emotion and feeling together with elements from travel, sports, documentary, nature and landscape photography, Finnish photographer Jaakko Posti creates some next-level adventure and action sports photos. We caught up with him to see what he carries with him when he goes out into the wild!

© Jaakko Posti

Talk us through your gear. What are your go-to items?

I'm a Sony Alpha Ambassador and I use Sony cameras for my work. I used to shoot with the Sony A99 camera, but then the original A7 mirrorless full frame camera was announced back in 2013. I have been pretty much using the Alpha 7 series cameras since then. The system has matured quite a bit since the first model and now I carry a Sony A7R2 body and their new mirrorless flagship model, the Sony A9. I think that these two bodies compliment each others quite nicely. The A7R2 with its 42Mpx sensor is great for landscape and portrait work or in a situation where I know I have to crop in a bit in post. The A9 on the other hand is a perfect companion in action and sports photography. The unbelievable AF functions of the A9, together with the 20FPS make my job a lot more efficient. I shoot more and more video together with photos and for that I feel that this mirrorless system is great.

The lenses I now mostly use on the wide end are Zeiss Batis 25mm F2 and the Sony FE 35mm F1.4. On the longer end I like to use the Sony FE 70-200mm F2.8 GM and Sony FE 85mm F1.4 GM lenses. What I really like about the Sony E-mount system is the option I have to go small and light if I want to.

I can for example use the A9 body with Zeiss 25mm/F2 + 55mm/F1.8 and 70-200mm/F4G and with those lenses, the system is really light and compact. And then again in situations where size and weight is not an issue and I just want to get the best IQ out of the system, I can add the battery grips to the bodies and use the fastest lenses like the Sony 70-200mm F2.8 GM, the 85mm F1.4 GM, the 35mm F1.4Z or the the 16-35mm F2.8 GM. With those lenses, the weight of the system is quite similar to a normal DSLR system.

Now when I´m shooting more and more video as well, I usually carry the DJI Mavic Pro with me. Drones can really open up your artistic creativity.  

For me the passion to action and outdoor photography started with the passion to the outdoors itself and I feel that with the small mirrorless system in my camera backpack I get to enjoy the skiing, mountain biking, trail running or other outdoor activities more. That was the most important reason I started using the mirrorless system and stayed with it although I felt that there were some compromises when compared to traditional DSLR cameras, but now after the announcement of Sony Alpha A9 camera I feel that there is no compromises anymore. 

Do you remember the first piece of photography gear you have ever owned?  

The first camera I have owned was a small Konica Minolta digital compact camera with a whopping 4Mpx sensor. Before that I had been taking some photos with my parents old film camera.

Is there anything special you carry with you on shoots? 

No, not really anything special. It depends a quite a lot of the stuff I´m shooting and what time of the year it is. Shell jacket is kind of must in the ever changing nordic weather we have here in the North Europe. Also what I usually have with me are first aid kit, multitool of some kind and a cup to drink from. How do you choose gear for different projects? 

Like I mentioned earlier I usually try to have a as compact camera setup with me as possible. But for example in shoots where I don´t move around that much like events or such I can have pretty much all the gear with me. 

On outdoor and action sport shoots I usually think about that where we are going to go and what we are going to shoot. If I know that the shoot is going to be really mobile I will try get the camera setup as small as possible. For example Sony A9 body with Batis 25/2, Sony 55/1.8, Sony 70200/4 is really compact and light weight setup. Also one factor that determines the camera equipment I bring with me is the area I´m going to do most of the shooting. For example if we are shooting most of photos in forest I will bring more wide-angle lenses with me. Also the same If we are for example skiing couloirs. If we are mostly going to shoot over the treeline in alpine I might have more of ”longer” lenses with me and maybe the 35mm is the widest on those kind of shoots.

Which piece of gear would you never leave at home? 

There is no specific camera or lenses I would´t leave at home. It all depends of the shoot. But what I always want to have with me is the Peak Desing camera clips. It is really nice to have the camera on hand all the time and like that you can capture some really cool moments you wouldn’t be able to to get if the camera would be inside the backpack. 

Does your gear sometimes take a pounding to get the shots you’re known for? 

Yeah almost all the time. Specially on winter time the weather can be a bit harsh to the equipment. -30*C degree temperatures and heavy snowfalls will but the equipment under some serious stress. Also I usually like to push my own limits while skiing or mountain biking and usually take a tumble here and there, and of course the equipment in my back feels those ones too. That said I haven´t broken any equipment yet.

Any items you wish you could add to your bag?

Sony Alpha mirrorless system now has all the essential lenses I need in my work. But one fun lens to have if Sony would ever develop one would be their own wide-angle tilt shift lens. I think I have pretty much all the other gear I could think of. I think it is more what I´m willing to carry with me in the bag.

Any tips for aspiring photographers? 

You need to have real passion to photography and shoot a lot of different stuff. I have shot and still do all kinds of commercial shoots, press, events, weddings, portraits, street photography, Landscape, sports and outdoors. I think when you photograph almost everything you will get to a lot of situations where you are not that comfortable with and overcoming those situations you will become a better photographer at the end.  

To see more of Jaakko's work, head over to his Facebook and make sure to follow him on Instagram

In A Flash: Shooting the Perfect Key Visual

Red Bull Illume In A Flash returns with its latest installment, focused on the most crucial element of any commercial campaign; the key visual.

Shooting a striking key visual is no easy task and it's something that comes down to the finest details. Use the pointers in the video above to help you along the way.

It all starts with brainstorming - nail down the concept and the message you want the visual to bring across. What definitely helps is scribbling what you want your final product to look like, this will help guide you while you're shooting.

Organize the shoot - do you need models, a location or props? Will you shoot in- or outdoors? How are you going to shoot? How many people do you need? These are all things to consider before you head out to the shoot.

Spend some time doing test shots. Make sure you've got your settings dialed in, so that when it's crunchtime, you're good to go and you know you'll get the shots you wanted.

Edit your shots. This is where you make your key visual really shine and come together.

Want more photo tips? Make sure to check out our other In A Flash videos by heading over to our YouTube channel!

Wakeboarding meets Architecture

Danish action sports photographer Jesper Grønnemark is known for pushing boundaries when it comes to photography and has an eye for incorporating objects or elements into his photos that you wouldn't think of. For his latest project, he fused elements of architecture with wakeboarding. Read the full story and see the results below...

© Jesper Gronnemark

How do you push the boundaries of what people believe possible in sports photography?

That exact question is the drive behind Jesper Grønnemark, who as a sports-photographer has become used to facing situations with a flexibility and fast thinking only few can brag about.

Location! Location! Location!

The shoot was in a small canal located in front of the Tietgen Residence Hall. A wish to combine sports-photography with architecture contributed to the selection of this very untraditional wakeboard scenario in the heart of Copenhagen.

“I saw this location a couple of years ago, and thought it was perfect for a wakeboard shoot. It is a minimalistic setup, but there is a great contrast between the murky water and the clean lines of the building”.

Did you hear the story about the two guys in the canal?

A wakeboarder in a small canal by the Tietgen Residence Hall is a rare sight and it attracts quite a few curious people. In the different tall houses around the shoot, people gathered in their windows to see what was going on.

Jesper floats in the water in a wetsuit and gets out of the water several times, running around to keep warm; a great example of Jesper’s dedication and hard work getting the perfect image.

The cold and not too clean water doesn’t stop wakeboarder Dres Damgaard either. He gets in as soon as the winch, which will pull him towards the bridge, is on.

“It was quite a challenge I had given myself. The water was very cold, so it didn’t take long before Dres and I were freezing. I had to use a lot of energy not to shake when Dres was being pulled by the winch, and I had to take pictures.”

Patience and equipment

This was an assignment that required patience, endurance and precision to create a great result, but it also demanded having the right equipment.

“This situation puts high demands on the equipment to function each and every time. Since I couldn’t afford to miss a shot it was amazing shooting with the flash system I use, which delivers the power, quality and speed necessary.”

So long, summer!

The Scandinavian summer sun is slowly setting, it has been a tough shoot for both Jesper and Dres. Even though they are tired, wet and longing to go home and take a shower, there is still a sense of satisfaction in the air. The hard work paid off and the images are even better than anticipated.

To see more of Jesper's work, head over to his Instagram, but not before checking out the results and some behind the scenes shots below!

Dusty Walls with Matt Hunter

Sterling Lorence fell in love with photography after biking through what he calls "the moody forests of the North Shore" and has been in the game for over 20 years. Collecting Red Bull Illume Finalist honors on multiple occasions, we decided to take a closer look at one of his more iconic images.

Red Bull Illume 2013: Sterling Lorence, Energy category finalist

© Sterling Lorence / Red Bull Illume

Matt Hunter has a reputation in freeride mountain biking for finding and building very progressive lines. Matt built this air for the filming of his segment in the film, 'Follow Me'. It is a 45-foot air to wall ride move that he hadn't done much practice on.

It is always stressful as a photographer to show up to a shoot like this, with a film crew, and have the majority of the pressure falling onto the athlete to throw down. Especially when the action is dangerously progressive like this and we all are unsure of what the outcome will be. We all want to shoulder more of the responsibility, but ultimately it is the athlete that has to be the most prepared.

I framed up this shot from this perspective to be able to express the entire story of his line and the size of the gap he had to make. I originally thought I would shoot it as a sequence so that the viewer would be able to understand the extreme journey more.

With my motor drive running, Matt nailed his line and I watched him hit the wall and carve out the finish. I was completely floored and in awe by the explosion of dust he had created. I never expected or predicted such a dramatic dust trail to happen as he smashed across the cliff face. As I sat back and reviewed my images, I saw this one frame and I realized that I no longer needed the full sequence. The entire story, speed, impact and energy of this huge air was captured in this single frame. That is why I love photography, telling so much of a story in a single image.

Want to see more images by Sterling Lorence? Head over to his Instagram and check out his website!