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Viki Gomez in Flight

One of the images in the 2013 Red Bull Illume Top 250 was taken by Dutch photographer Rutger Pauw. The shot of BMX rider Viki Gomez has already received plenty of attention so Red Bull Illume caught up with Pauw to discuss exactly what it’s all about…

Can you give us some background to the project?
Last year I was in Japan on a job, and I noticed how graceful people looked moving around in their kimonos, which gave me the idea for the photo. Nicola Jane Gulliver then hand-made the suit out of 20 meters of parachute silk.

Was it spontaneous or did you have a shot in mind?
I knew exactly what I wanted to capture, Viki helped out a lot by suggesting different tricks. The challenging bit was finding a trick that fit in well with the shape of the suit. Viki's body position needed to complement that, so the choice of trick was a bit different than usual. It was funny walking out of a full day’s shoot with just one image.

It must have been tough…
I'm happy Matty Lambert did such a good job on the video (see above), because it shows people Viki actually pulled that trick! The shot means a lot to me, as it was made with people I care about a lot, and the fact that I had no clue if it would even work at all. Shoots like this are most exciting to me.

What gear did you use?
Leica approached me about trying out their new S system, it has central shutter lenses, which sounded very interesting because it allows for flash sync speeds up to 1/1000th of a second. No tricks with hypersync or special transmitters that fail with the slightest bit of interference, it just works. I used my 8-year-old Pocketwizard Plus2's that have never let me down. Nice peace of mind when someone wants to do a trick just once.

It's safe to say I've never taken a picture with so much detail and sharpness but it's pretty exciting when you see it on your screen!

I used flashlights with big reflectors to light the whole scene, I also wanted to freeze the flour that was being thrown in the background so it was definitely the way to go.

You must’ve needed plenty of windpower…
I rented the biggest industrial office fan I could find. 10.000 cubic meters of air per hour amazingly only made just enough wind to make the sleeves of the suit fly. Vik had to carve in sharply to give them extra lift, making it all more difficult for him to ride.

Congrats on your images in the 2013 Red Bull Illume Top 250…
To me the most important part of the competition is to get photos in the book. It'll be around forever, and in my opinion features some of the best sports images I've ever seen, so it's a huge honour!

Be sure to check out the project on Rutger’s new website and Leica’s Facebook page.

© Rutger Pauw // Athlete: Viki Gomez // Location: Luxembourg City, Luxembourg

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Freezing the 400m Hurdle Champion Kariem Hussein

Red Bull Illume photographer Gian Paul Lozza recently completed a cool shoot with Kariem Hussein, the European Champion of 400m hurdles, using the broncolor Scoros.

“For some time now I was preparing this shoot with Kariem. He is an amazing guy and really cool to work with. It is obvious that we tried to capture his speed and especially his jumping over hurdles. But as always, I tried to do it differently,” says Gian Paul Lozza.

“Under the Ahtletic stadion in Zurich we found a perfect location for this shoot. There is a concrete tunnel with an indoor running track. We had different ideas of what we wanted to try out. One was to work with reflecting tape and reflective clothing. Another idea was to do something with mirrors and to finish, a classic, the all-in-one sequence.”

“As always when I want to capture something fast, I use the broncolor Scoros. This power packs together with Pulso Twin heads works perfectly if you need a lot of power and you want to freeze motion. And because I shoot everything with my Hasselblad with their bigger chip, I need even faster flash duration. The only way to control this, is bron’s cut off technichnology which is unbeatable.”

“For the sequential goal I needed power packs, which can recharge super-fast but also a lot of power, because I wanted to close aperture as much as possible to freeze the motion. For these kind of ideas, the Scoros with Twin heads are the perfect solution. Superfast recharging time with a lot of power. I’m used to capture these all-in-one sequences from my time as a snowboard photographer with natural light, but now it is cool to do the same with flashes. It opens a lot of new possibilities and I can develop new ideas to create images.”

This article originally appeared on the broncolor blog.

© Gian Paul Lozzabroncolor
© Gian Paul Lozzabroncolor
© Gian Paul Lozzabroncolor
© Gian Paul Lozzabroncolor
© Claudio Casanova

The Return Of The Ring of Fire


After recently showcasing an epic shoot by Claudio Casanova, the Red Bull Illume photographer has shared two more interesting shots with us and explained how he pulled them off with the help of his crew.

Steel wool shot:

“Roger nailed it in this session on what was arguably the smallest jump we've ever shot with this air method. This photo was taken just outside my hometown of Einsiedeln. I had the idea long before I scouted the spot and was lucky to find this tunnel just a short drive away from my house. Thanks to a very long exposure time it seems as if Roger was jumping through a ring of fire, but in reality the circle you see was drawn by myself before I snapped the picture as Roger hit the jump.

The effect of fire was simply made by a piece of burning steel wool attached to a wire whip which was tied to a rope. I triggered the camera via Pocket Wizard, fireman Deniz lit it up and I started swinging. After a couple of seconds of swinging I ran off and cleared the jump for the riders. Luck was also on our side due to the fact that we had a full moon that night, so no extra lights for the riders were needed.

Almost everything was perfect, which is rarely the case when shooting snowboarding!”


Flares shot:

“For this project the timing was really crucial as we only had 30 seconds for the whole procedure. We built a perfectly symmetrical jump and started sessioning it as I positioned the camera. After we knew the approximate height of the jump, we set up a little scaffolding on a table I could perform my display of firework magic.

For this photo of Deniz, Mike was standing by the camera to check if the flashes and camera were working and gave a 30 second countdown for me to light the flare and start the exposure. Everything from removing the scaffolding to the rider dropping in was set to happen at a certain time during this countdown. If there were any delay it would not have worked.

The only source of light for the rider in the run in was a small headlamp, which also worked as an indicator in the shot if the action was captured at the right moment. As we were clearing the jump for the rider, Deniz was already getting closer. I rushed over to my flash setup and got ready to shoot. As soon as Deniz busted out his method, I fired the flash thus freezing a single shot into the long exposure photo.

We had a good feeling about this one so we rushed down to check the photo. All we heard was, “BOOM! That's the one!”… The position of the rider inside the ring was perfect and not something to take for granted. Most likely it would’ve taken another 50 tries to get it right like that!”


Be sure to check out Claudio’s website.

© Claudio Casanova

Making of: Infrared photography

Our next throwback video features Danish photographer Esben Zøllner Olesen discussing his basic workflow when shooting infrared images with an IR-converted DSLR camera. Infrared photography may seem quite daunting, but Esben Zøllner Olesen delivers insight and tips for every stage of the process, right from gear setup to post-processing to create a nice overview of the technique which can capture some stunning results.  

Photo credits: Esben Zøllner Olesen

© Esben Zøllner OlesenRed Bull
© Esben Zøllner OlesenRed Bull
© Esben Zøllner OlesenRed Bull
© Esben Zøllner OlesenRed Bull
© Esben Zøllner OlesenRed Bull
© Esben Zøllner OlesenRed Bull
© Toby Harriman

Developing a Unique Surf Photography Style

As a photographer, one of the hardest things to do is to develop your own distinct style. Photographer Toby Harriman’s goal was to do just this and in order to separate himself a little from other surf photographers he focused on creating fine art rather than journalism-style photos. The Red Bull Illume team caught up with Toby to discuss his ongoing Modern Surf collection… 

 “One day after finishing up some of my black and white architecture shots, I decided to try a similar technique on my surf photos and experiment with long exposure surf shots. I have seen it done before, so I knew it was do-able. Just needed to find my style for it. That blurred look you see is mostly created in camera, by doing a shutter drag, leaving the shutter open and basically tracking the surfer trying to keep him in focus and everything else blurred,” says Harriman.

"The surf photographer explains how he further developed his technique with post-production: “I then use software like Photoshop or Lightroom to give it that dark mono look which I like to call 'Modern.' I am always trying to perfect and adapt this style, which gets me excited to keep it going. When I look at this series, it really allows me to focus in and to see the connection between the surfer and the power of the ocean, which is what I am trying to create for the viewer. Something with deeper meaning and something that makes people look at a subject in a whole different perspective!”
 

Visit Toby Harriman’s website here and catch up with him on Facebook.

© Toby Harriman
© Toby Harriman
© Toby Harriman
© Toby Harriman
© Toby Harriman
© Toby Harriman
© Toby Harriman

Making of: Shooting news pictures

The latest in our Throwback Videos series, sees us rejoining Romina Amato, a freelance photographer from Switzerland who specializes in news. In this vid, Romina offers her advice on launching a successful career in news photography and explains the many skills an aspiring news photographer must demonstrate. She also offers her insight on different camera lenses, image format, delivery, and most importantly, creativity.

 

Equipment

Cameras:
z.B. Canon 1D Mark 4, Canon 7D

Lenses:
z.B. Canon Fisheye 15mm f2.8 , Tokina 11-16mm f2.8, Canon 16-35mm f2.8, Canon 50mm f1.2, Canon 100mm f2, Canon 24-105mm f4, Canon 70-200 mm f2.8, Sigma f120-300mm 2.8, Canon 400mm f2.8

Memory card: SanDisk Extreme

Tools: z.B. Photoshop CS4 & CS5 , Photo Mechanic, Adobe Bridge 

 

Photographer: © Romina Amato
www.romina-amato.ch

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