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Nice Moves on the Dachstein

As any action sport photographer knows, shooting in sometimes crazy locations is all part of the job. But what happens when it's a fashion shoot on a mountain edge and the athlete is a model in high heels?
Helge Kirchberger, who's worked with the Flying Bulls and at Hangar 7, tells us about his recent shoot on the Dachstein glacier using the broncolor Move Powerpack.

What was the idea behind the shoot?
During a job in the Dachstein ice cave (near Salzburg, Austria) I discovered a great location up there. I desperately wanted to do a shoot on this rock.

Looks like an extreme location
We were on a sloping rocky plateau just a few meters square and beyond that it was a sheer drop of a few hundred meters. The rock was also wet and loose so we had to move carefully!

How did the model enjoy that?
Our model Carina was amazing. She had to wear high-heels while we were all equipped with proper hiking boots. We had told her in advance that the location would be extraordinary and that she should definitely not be scared of heights. She did really well!

What was the idea with the birds?
During the first shoot on the Dachstein, the model had a phobia of birds and was really stressed out. That’s when I had the idea to include alpine choughs in our fashion shoot, like in Alfred Hitchcock’s film “The Birds”. To get the birds to come closer we fed them bread in the beginning. Within no time, more and more birds arrived. Those birds have become used to climbers and aren’t too shy anymore.

What equipment did you use?
In the studio, we worked with Broncolor Scoro A4 and A2 as well as grafit generators — a perfect setup in terms of performance and handling. In addition, we used two Broncolor Verso with rechargeable batteries and Broncolor Pulso G flash heads and a number of different lights.
Canon EOS 5 Mark III with EF 70-200, EF 24-70 and EF 16-35mm.

How does The Move make life easier?
The performance quality really makes the Move Powerpack stand out. It's low weight, full power and adjustability make it an essential tool for outdoor photoshoots. It’s particularly useful when you shoot on locations where electricity is unavailable but you still want to work with artificial light. With the move, you can perfectly implement all those possibilities. It’s reliable and convinces with sophisticated handling and excellent processing.



© Helge Kirchberger

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@ Stu Gibson

Talking drones with Stu Gibson

As drones become more and more affordable, an increasing number of photographers are getting in on the action. Red Bull Illume finalist Stu Gibson is one of the photographers who has been producing a lot of aerial footage recently as can be seen on his Facebook page, so we caught up with him to discuss…

What drone did you go for? What's your setup?  
It changes from shoot to shoot. I use a range – from DJI Phantoms to octocopters, mostly with some home modifications. 

Has it changed your approach to photography?
It’s made me very bored with normal stills, aerials are way more fun – but I can swap from stills to video on all rigs. Even on my phantom I use a Lumix for stills. 

Are you getting more gigs because of it?
It’s just another piece of equipment to the kit now but I’m sure its helped get some jobs as the client knows I can do both. My drones come with me wherever I go! 

Getting your hands on a decent drone may be a worthy addition for action sports photographers. Get some inspiration from Stu’s latest video here and be sure to check out his website here

@ Stu Gibson
@ Stu Gibson
@ Stu Gibson
@ Stu Gibson
@ Stu Gibson
@ Stu Gibson
@ Stu Gibson
© Fisheye (Alex Roubaud / Alex Voyer)

Underwater Photography with Freedivers Alex & Alex

Freediving is a sport in which you should never dive alone, so it’s good to have a wingman. Ten years ago, two French freedivers Alex Roubaud and Alex Voyer teamed up and began taking every opportunity to travel to new dive spots. The pair also began Fisheye, a small association showcasing their breathtaking freedive photography from their dives.

What’s interesting are the benefits that freediving offers underwater photography: “Freediving allows us to see the world differently to a traditional scuba diver. It’s the most discreet way to get in the water, and to approach any animal in its environment. Although we can’t go as deep, we can dive faster in all directions,” explain the duo.

“We always alternate the dives, one on the surface and one in the deep – this is for security reasons but it also allows us to double the contact time with animals and get them used to our presence without undue stress for them. Working together is essential for us – we know each other perfectly and a few words are enough to understand each other.”

Enjoy the accompanying gallery of unique freedive photography from Alex & Alex, be sure to visit their website here, and hit them up on Facebook here.

© Fisheye (Alex Roubaud / Alex Voyer)
© Fisheye (Alex Roubaud / Alex Voyer)
© Fisheye (Alex Roubaud / Alex Voyer)
© Fisheye (Alex Roubaud / Alex Voyer)
© Fisheye (Alex Roubaud / Alex Voyer)
© Fisheye (Alex Roubaud / Alex Voyer)
© Fisheye (Alex Roubaud / Alex Voyer)
© Fisheye (Alex Roubaud / Alex Voyer)
Meet Alex & Alex: Alex Voyer (left) & Alex Roubaud (right)

To the Ends of the Earth with Krystle Wright

"I've an insatiable desire to explore with a camera. Adventure photography is a lifestyle I live and breathe. But, also a passion and obsession." 

Red Bull Illume photographer Krystle Wright needs no introduction to the adventure photography community – yet the above video by Canon Austrialia showcasing the photographer’s lifestyle and philosophy will help you get to know her a little better. With stunning footage, examples of her brilliant work and some great BTS scenes, the video provides great insight into the lifestyle of an adventure photographer.  

You can visit Krystle’s website here, and follow her on Facebook here.

© Mike Campau & Tim Tadder, Lifeproof

Time to go CGI?

Creative duo Mike Campau and Tim Tadder recently created a series of commercial advertisements with sports athletes using CGI to create compelling effects.

As a concept, it is fair to say that the team nailed it with the final execution. Photography purists may be dismayed, but it’s hard to disagree with the fact that CGI creates infinite possibilities –and the eye-catching effects are what many clients will be looking for. The shoot was for tablet and phone case maker Lifeproof.    

You can watch the full studio BTS video of the Lifeproof shoot here, and see the final results in the gallery.


(Thanks to Mike Campau, Tim Tadder & Lifeproof for permission to post the images)

© Mike Campau & Tim Tadder, Lifeproof
© Mike Campau & Tim Tadder, Lifeproof
© Mike Campau & Tim Tadder, Lifeproof

Skate the Line

In his latest shoot, Red Bull Illume photographer Dan Vojtěch used reflective tape to produce an eye-catching series of images of athlete Maxim Habanec skating in a dark skatepark.

“There were no lights on at the skatepark, so we used 25 LED film lights to provide enough light for Maxim,” says Vojtěch.

“The main photo from the top was taken on a Nikon D4 via wifi transmitter, with a flash mounted on a helicopter and controlled from the ground by PC. We also had other two strobes on the ground. This session took from 7pm until 3am – it was really cold and windy so I would love to say thanks to all participants again!”

Be sure to check out Dan’s website & Facebook page for more creativity.

© Dan Vojtěch
© Dan Vojtěch
© Dan Vojtěch
© Dan Vojtěch
© Dan Vojtěch
© Dan Vojtěch
© Dan Vojtěch
© Dan Vojtěch
© Dan Vojtěch
© Dan Vojtěch
© Dan Vojtěch
© Dan Vojtěch

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